The exam covers chapters 1-6 (just the bits of Chapter 1 covered in the online notes).

The exam will be 1 hour and include up to 100 multiple choice questions.

You may not be able to answer them all in the allotted time.  That’s OK.  I will scale up the grades as necessary.

The Exam is NOT open book.

ANY cheating, use of notes, text, or communication during the exam will result in a “0” on the exam and an “F” in the course.  The exam will be monitored by Zoom.

Some of the topics to review include (this is not an exhaustive list):

  • things that affect temperatures – globally, locally, and over a 24 hour period
  • the various forces associated with winds
  • solar radiation and insolation
  • the basic composition of the atmosphere and what various layers ‘do”
  • solar winds/auroras
  • global and local winds (primary, secondary and tertiary)
  • albedo
  • wind chill and heat index
  • high and low pressure
  • geostrophic winds
  • isotherms and isosbars
  • rainbows
  • air pollution
  • urban effects on temperature
  • continentality

The exam is NOT open book.

The exam will be monitored by Zoom – all activity will be observed.  You MUST keep your webcam on.  I may ask you to share your computer screen.  I may ask you to verify your identity by showing ID.

Any academic dishonesty will result in a 0 and an “F’ in the course. I will be checking. No appeals.

Remember you are studying in Catholic learning environment and are expected to behave by standards of Christian morality and ethics.

Format

The exam will be 80 multiple choice, short answer and other questions.

There will probably be too many questions for you to answer in the time allowed (yes, there is a time limit). You will have to work quickly. That’s OK. If I need to, I will scale the marks.

For example

Climatology refers to

   a. the scientific study of climate

    b. the study of climbing apparatuses in playgrounds

    c. the study of those who have summited Mt. Everest

        Hopefully you’ll pick (a)! 

 How to Study …

  1. Read over the online notes.  I like the “onion method” of studying as opposed to cramming.  The onion method means I read over the notes tonight … and absorb some (one layer of knowledge).  I read over the notes tomorrow (another layer of knowledge).  And so on, and so on, gradually adding layers of knowledge.  The challenge is, you can’t be an onion by starting to study the night before the exam at 11:59 p.m.!  You need to start today! You can NOT use your notes during the exam. Doing so will mean an automatic 0.
  2. As you read the notes, do use the figures in the text (an online resources) as references. The figures/pictures really help you visualize what you’re studying!
  3. Review the chapters in the text.  Note that I will NOT ask you anything that is only in the text, but not in your notes! You can NOT use your text during the exam. Doing so will mean an automatic 0.
What Should You Bring or NOT Bring?

You should bring …

  • Yourself!  (refreshed, relaxed, invigorated, empowered by the Spirit)
  • A pen (and pencil if you wish, for the diagrams).

You should NOT bring …

  • Your text or notes (sorry, this exam is not open book!)
  • Your cousin (a geography graduate student at Cambridge)
  • A calculator (any math will be VERY simple)
  • A cell phone, iphone, tablet, netbook, desktop, or other electronic device
  • Any crib notes, cheat sheets, or other “aids”

You’ll do fine!  That’s about it!  Study hard!  I know there is lots to know and lots to memorize (the plague of introductory science courses!), but go at it!

Try to remember that this is God’s creation we are studying (it’s one of the symptoms of the Fall that studying divine artistry seems like drudgery!).   As you study the Earth-Atmosphere system, you are studying God’s handiwork!  You are doing theology (learning about God)!  Hard though it is, try to keep that perspective going …

God bless,

Bruce